27 different ways to get a body that you love

  1. Eat less carbs
  2. Eat less fat
  3. Eat more carbs
  4. Eat more fat
  5. But just coconut fat
  6. Do quit sugar
  7. Actually, don’t quit sugar
  8. Just drink lemon juice
  9. And only eat cabbage soup
  10. Eat plenty of chocolate (of course)
  11. But only eat alkaline foods
  12. Eat meat, but never grains and legumes
  13. Eat grains and legumes, but never meat
  14. Exercise more
  15. Or don’t exercise at all
  16. Skip breakfast
  17. But never skip any meals
  18. Just go gluten-free
  19. And dairy-free, and nut-free
  20. Hey, what about some days going almost food-free
  21. Definitely don’t cook
  22. But do eat and cook like the Japanese
  23. Or maybe more like the French
  24. Count every calorie
  25. But because that’s too hard, count ProPoints instead
  26. Maybe it’s best to believe in miracles, or…
  27. Learn to love and accept your amazing body for exactly how it is.

Yes, the dieting industry is painfully inconsistent, unscientific, and, more often than not, damaging to our health and well-being.

The good news is you don’t actually have to follow along.

Should you quit sugar?

As always, it’s your choice.

But whilst limiting our intake of high-sugar, nutrient-poor foods (like confectionary, soft drinks, biscuits and cakes) is obviously important for good health, there are 2 things to be aware of if you choose to quit sugar all together.

First, sugar doesn’t automatically make a food unhealthy. No one became overweight from a banana or an apple, and a small amount of added sugar to a nutritious food doesn’t suddenly make it bad. A teaspoon of sugar can help make the medicine go down.

Second, being low in sugar doesn’t automatically make a food healthy. After all, potato chips are low in sugar, and a sugar-free brownie is still a brownie.

Indeed, foods are an array of different fats, proteins, carbohydrates, vitamins, minerals and more. Their health effect is based on the combined role of each of these, not just the presence or absence of one.

Using a single nutrient can therefore play a role when comparing two otherwise similar foods, but never in judging the healthiness of a whole food or diet alone. 

This concept holds true for not just sugar, but for calories, carbohydrates, fat, fructose, glycemic index, protein, saturated fat and more.

Understand this, and you’ll understand why a lot of fad diets are indeed just fads.

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